Beware of Snow and Ice on Vehicles: It’s the law.

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Beware of Snow and Ice on Vehicles: It’s the law.

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The Pennsylvania Snow/Ice Removal Law went into effect in 2006; in New Jersey in 2010, and as of January 1, 2014 new fines are in effect in Connecticut. These rules are sometimes referred to as “solid precipitation” laws and cover snow, ice, hail and sleet on a moving motor vehicle.

Accumulated snow and ice on a vehicle can pose a serious safety hazard. All motorists need to clear snow and ice from their vehicles. For example, New Jersey specifies that the exposed surfaces of a motor vehicle: the cab of a truck, the top of a trailer or semitrailer being drawn by a motor vehicle, and the top of an intermodal freight container being carried by an intermodal chassis, must be clear of snow and ice (but the driver is not liable in New Jersey if the motor vehicle, trailer, semitrailer, or container was not in his physical possession or “control” at the time the snow or ice accumulated).

Fines in Pennsylvania range from $200 up to $1,000 for each offense –if any snow or ice falls from their vehicle and causes injury or death.

Fines in New Jersey are from $25 to $75 for snow or ice accumulation and from $200 to $1,000, if the failure to remove ice and snow resulted in an injury or property damage; and from $500 to $1,500, for each offense for commercial motor vehicle drivers.

In Connecticut commercial drivers now face a fine of $500 to $1,250 for snow or ice causing an injury or death.

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Turnpike or toll-road operators may require snow/ice accumulation be removed before entering the road. Massachusetts Turnpike Police may fine drivers $100 for failing to clear their vehicles.

States without specific snow/ice removal laws may charge drivers for “negligent driving” — or operating in a way that endangers or is likely to endanger another person or property, for example, New Hampshire where fines range from $250 to $500.

Always make reasonable efforts to remove accumulated ice or snow from the hood, trunk or roof of a vehicle, or a truck’s cab, or any trailer. It’s the friendly way to drive.

Commercial snow removal equipment for trucks and buses is available from some of the following firms:

Durasweeper              http://www.durasweeper.com/

McCormick Equip. Co. – Polar Blade     http://www.mccequip.com/

Reed Screed      http://www.reedscreed.com/

Scraper Systems     http://www.scrapersystems.com/

Snow Be Gone      http://www.snowbegoneinc.com/

 

With thanks to Mr. Ozzie Mazzuca, MBA, CDS, for this topic and Mr. Michael Millard CSS, CHMS, for various links.