Your Loss Control Plan (Part 2)

caution

Loss Control to Major Tom . . .

In Part 1 we reviewed inherent risk and the duty of a business to engage in reasonable diligence or due diligence in the conduct of daily operations. Not all risks are apparent. Every business faces risks that can be hidden. Reasonable diligence is about the management of risks. In business one effective tool to manage risk is a Loss Control Plan.

A good Loss Control Plan goes beyond a simple checklist. Some key elements would include:

Safety Policy — sets the expectation that it is the responsibility of all personnel to create and maintain a safe work environment. The Safety Policy should include a Safety Policy Statement:

  • Safety and health in our company must be a part of every operation. Without question, it is every employee’s responsibility at all levels.
  • We will maintain a safety and health program conforming to the best practices of organizations of this type. To be successful, such a program must embody the proper attitudes toward injury and illness prevention on the part of supervisors and employees. It also requires cooperation in all safety and health matters, not only between supervisors and employees, but also between employees and their co-workers. Only through such a cooperative effort can an effective safety and health program be established and preserved.
  • The safety and health of every employee is a high priority. Management accepts responsibility for providing a safe working environment and employees are expected to take responsibility for performing work in accordance with safe standards and practices. Safety and health will only be achieved through teamwork.  Everyone must join together in promoting safety and health and taking every reasonable measure to assure safe working conditions in the company. OSHA

The next part of the Loss Control Plan should detail everyone’s (Management, Supervisor’s and Employees’) responsibilities in meeting these goals. Additional topics should include:

• New Employee Orientation
• Training
• Safety Meetings
• Incident Reporting, Investigation & Analysis
• Standards & Procedures
• General Safety Information

Depending on the type of operations the following areas of concern may need to be covered:

• Hazard Communication Program
• Safety Data Sheets  (SDS)
• Lockout/Tagout Program
• Hearing Conservation
• Confined Space

Start With a Template

There are many templates (models or examples) available from sources as your insurance company and/or industry associations that can help in putting together a Loss Control Plan and all of its associated components.

Other Loss Control Planning tips:

Get inputs from staff, especially line staff. They know the risks.

Review your Loss Control Plan, especially in times of change.

Contact your insurance company for assistance. Many insurance companies have a loss control department. (It may be known as risk management, risk engineering, or a number of other names.) Usually there are no charge or fees for this help.

Thank you for reading this.

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