Defusing Complacency at Work: J.A. Rodriguez Jr.

Drayage Ramp Crash

Monday Morning Blues . . .

It was about 11 AM on Monday morning when the driver pulling a container came around the corner on the Interstate 5 ramp to Interstate 405 in Portland, Oregon. Perhaps he had run this route hundreds of times with no problems. But today would be different.

As he came around the curve, the load shifted and resulted in what some call an “upset.” Neither the driver nor any member of the the public were injured, You can bet his boss was upset when he called it in . . .

Another Monday Does Not Have to be Another Monday

Not according to  J.A. Rodriguez, who gave his presentation this afternoon on Safety Complacency in the Workplace today in a webinar sponsored by Avetta and EHS Today.

If safety complacency is happening at your workplace, it’s not by accident, says Rodriguez, a nationally known presenter.

In fact, if complacency happens, it’s usually the result of design: it’s part of a process that allows it to happen.

Furthermore, because it’s part of a process, it can be changed. Rodriguez gave his strategies to overcome workplace complacency, followed by a Q&A session.

I would encourage everyone involved in safety to view his presentation when it is posted by EHS.

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U-Turns: A Bad Idea

U-turn follies

A Sure Short Cut . . .

This driver became hung up after trying to sneak across the medium.

In a sense, he was lucky. U-turns by tractor-trailers have resulted in a number of serious collisions resulting in injuries and death. As these type of collisions are considered “gross negligence” by the driver (and carrier), they can also result in large lawsuits against the driver and his employer, and the end of a driver’s career.

Here’s the whole story . . .

U-turns are always risky and dangerous. Other drivers will not expect a large vehicle to swing out in their lane, and if moving at high speeds, likely will not have time to respond. In some cases a large truck can blend in with the background, so they may not even see the vehicle.

Never make a U-turn. Period.

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Latest Road Rage Attack Leaves Driver Hurt

Miami road rage

A Violent Reaction

The moving truck beeped its horn after a car driver failed to stop at an intersection. This enraged the car driver.

The car driver waited for the truck to stop at an upcoming intersection. He then calmly shot the truck driver in the face and drove away. The driver of the truck is expected to recover.

Welcome to Miami . . .

Not New . . . But a Growing Problem for Carriers

Road Rage is not a new phenomena on U.S. roads and certainly not in Florida, where a truck driver in May of last year, after making a lane change on I-10 between Commerce Parkway and Chaffee Road in Jacksonsville, Florida was fatally shot.

Highway fights between drivers are not uncommon. Incidents of road rage have doubled in a five year period according to ABC News.

Not Covered

Road rage is a listed as an exemption in many auto insurance policies says the Insurance Information Institute.  That’s because damages resulting from road rage don’t fit the definition of an accident, but rather are due to driver behavior. If your driver initiates a road-rage claim, your company will likely be on the hook and not have any coverage.

Typical triggers for road rage include lane changes and merging. Anyone looking at loss-runs will typically see this category as being in their top five claims.

Inform Your Drivers

Let drivers know your policy about conflicts with other drivers. Inform your drivers of the need to always de-escalate any potential conflict that could develop while driving.

Although it may seem like common sense and courtesy should prevent involvement in a potential road rage situation, I would still recommend periodic road rage training.

Remind drivers not to play “traffic cop.” It’s always better from a safety perspective to yield right of way. And behaviors as speeding or aggressive driving are not what any carrier should expect from a professional driver.

Related:

Preventing Sideswipes

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Be the Best: Leadership Development at Southeastern Freight Lines

Southeastern

The Leader of the Pack

Over sixty-six years old and a third-generation company, Southeastern Freight Lines (SEFL), with operations in the southeastern region of the U.S. (and beyond through a network of partners), calls itself, “the leading provider of regional less-than-truckload (LTL) transportation services.” To sustain its leadership position, Southeastern knows it needs to develop its leaders and its unique culture so the company and its associates will continue to flourish. Here’s how they do it.

Human Relations

All associates at Southeastern are part of an Individualized Quality (IQ) workgroup team. Several times throughout the year, Southeastern conducts a 3-day Human Relations Seminar for its team leaders. Seminar participants study Principles of Human Relations, “proper Corrective Action, follow up technique, Safety, and cultivating a strong Southeastern Culture within their IQ Workgroup.”

Each morning the participants took tests which covered the previous day’s material. These test scores were used for both individual and group competition.

Quest for Quality

The company motto is “Quality without Question.” Southeastern is committed to improved quality and trains all of its leaders on Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Lean methodology.

Southeastern Freight Lines Lean 5S

Techs Too

Training at Southeastern doesn’t stop at the manager level. In-house technicians undergo Associate Continuing Education (ACE) training and certification, conducted by their maintenance department and outside vendors.

“If you take care of your people, they will take care of the customer, and that will take care of the future.” W. T. Cassels, founder, Southeastern Freight Lines

Fast Facts: Southeastern Freight Lines

Size: 3,036 power units, 4,048 drivers

Motto: Quality without Question

Company Saying: “Everyone sells and everyone serves.”

Risk Partner: Self-insured

Lessons Learned:  Develop and invest in your people. Adapt best business practices to fit your culture. Fully adopt new business tools by a show of unwavering support and commitment. Make best business practices part of your unique culture.

Thank you for reading this.