Hiring? Revised Form I-9 Requirement

USCIS

The New I-9 Form

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has released a revised version of the I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification.

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States.

This includes citizens and noncitizens. Both employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. On the form, an employee must attest to his or her employment authorization. The employee must also present his or her employer with acceptable documents evidencing identity and employment authorization. The employer must examine the employment eligibility and identity document(s) an employee presents to determine whether the document(s) reasonably appear to be genuine and to relate to the employee and record the document information on the Form I-9. The list of acceptable documents can be found on the last page of the form. Employers must retain Form I-9 for a designated period and make it available for inspection by authorized government officers. NOTE: State agencies may use Form I-9. Also, some agricultural recruiters and referrers for a fee may be required to use Form I-9. —USCIS

 

What’s New?

The latest I-9 form has a revised List of Acceptable Documents and specifically an updated List C, to include the most current version of the certification or report of birth—issued by the U.S. State Department.

What’s Required?

Failure to comply by the Sept. 18, 2017 deadline can result in significant fines.

For more information on the I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, please visit the revised I-9 page. It is recommended to immediately put the updated I-9 form into use.

Thank you for reading this.

Make G.O.A.L. Your Backing Goal

backing error

A Sad . . . But True Story

A driver was backing into a parking space at a truck stop. As he was backing, he came too close to the vehicle parked on his blind side and backed into it. What does he do? He pulls forward and while focusing on his blind side, he backed into the truck parked on the driver’s side of his vehicle . . .

Nobody said it was easy . . .

Not all backing collisions end up costing “only” $5,000 in claims as in the story above. People can be seriously hurt, or even fatally injured in a backing collision.

Year-after-year, backing collisions remain one of the most frequent category of all collisions. But they are also in the category of the most preventable collisions.

What to do?

Remember G.O.A.L

Savvy delivery and trucking companies encourage their drivers to Get Out And Look (G.O.A.L.). Don’t back “by feel.” Slamming forty tons of vehicle against anything—even at a slow speed—can result in thousands of dollars of damage and destruction.

Drivers need to walk their path and look for potential obstacles. Look for overhead obstacles, too. Low tree branches or power lines can really mess up your day.

Get out and look as many times as you need to. You can’t be too safe.

backing errorUse a Spotter While Backing

A spotter can help avoid obstacles. Be sure you can see your spotter and your spotter can see you. You know—that eye contact thing.

Review any hand signals with the spotter.

And maintain eye contact. Stop if you don’t see the spotter.

The driver, however, is ultimately responsible for any movements of the vehicle. The driver in the above crash photos lost eye contact with the spotter . . .

Always Back Slowly

Idle while backing. Never use the fuel pedal or place the vehicle in a higher reverse gear while backing. Slow and sure wins the race—especially in reverse.

Practice, Practice, Practice

Backing does not come naturally for most drivers. Like most things, the more one does it, the easier it is to do.

But not any less dangerous.

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