Shortcuts . . . Taking the Low Road

In the ditchTaking the Low Road . . .

Shortcuts seem to offer a quick way to get where you want to go. This driver saw a number of cars cutting across a medium to a service road and decided to follow their lead.

Unfortunately he was driving a heavy vehicle and quickly became bogged down.

But say that he did make it across. This driver probably did not factor in all the up and down stresses and strains that would be put on the frame and on the trailer’s walls. Twisting the truck and trailer can cause both obvious damage or even hidden damage that can shorten the life of the vehicle.

Using (or abusing) a vehicle in a manner it was not designed is never a good idea. It is a recipe for disaster.

Stick to what you know. What works for another vehicle may not work for yours . . .

Here is the original video . . .

♦  Thank you for reading this.

Defusing Complacency at Work: J.A. Rodriguez Jr.

Drayage Ramp Crash

Monday Morning Blues . . .

It was about 11 AM on Monday morning when the driver pulling a container came around the corner on the Interstate 5 ramp to Interstate 405 in Portland, Oregon. Perhaps he had run this route hundreds of times with no problems. But today would be different.

As he came around the curve, the load shifted and resulted in what some call an “upset.” Neither the driver nor any member of the the public were injured, You can bet his boss was upset when he called it in . . .

Another Monday Does Not Have to be Another Monday

Not according to  J.A. Rodriguez, who gave his presentation this afternoon on Safety Complacency in the Workplace today in a webinar sponsored by Avetta and EHS Today.

If safety complacency is happening at your workplace, it’s not by accident, says Rodriguez, a nationally known presenter.

In fact, if complacency happens, it’s usually the result of design: it’s part of a process that allows it to happen.

Furthermore, because it’s part of a process, it can be changed. Rodriguez gave his strategies to overcome workplace complacency, followed by a Q&A session.

I would encourage everyone involved in safety to view his presentation when it is posted by EHS.

Thank you for viewing this.

 

U-Turns: A Bad Idea

U-turn follies

A Sure Short Cut . . .

This driver became hung up after trying to sneak across the medium.

In a sense, he was lucky. U-turns by tractor-trailers have resulted in a number of serious collisions resulting in injuries and death. As these type of collisions are considered “gross negligence” by the driver (and carrier), they can also result in large lawsuits against the driver and his employer, and the end of a driver’s career.

Here’s the whole story . . .

U-turns are always risky and dangerous. Other drivers will not expect a large vehicle to swing out in their lane, and if moving at high speeds, likely will not have time to respond. In some cases a large truck can blend in with the background, so they may not even see the vehicle.

Never make a U-turn. Period.

Thanks for reading this.

Latest Road Rage Attack Leaves Driver Hurt

Miami road rage

A Violent Reaction

The moving truck beeped its horn after a car driver failed to stop at an intersection. This enraged the car driver.

The car driver waited for the truck to stop at an upcoming intersection. He then calmly shot the truck driver in the face and drove away. The driver of the truck is expected to recover.

Welcome to Miami . . .

Not New . . . But a Growing Problem for Carriers

Road Rage is not a new phenomena on U.S. roads and certainly not in Florida, where a truck driver in May of last year, after making a lane change on I-10 between Commerce Parkway and Chaffee Road in Jacksonsville, Florida was fatally shot.

Highway fights between drivers are not uncommon. Incidents of road rage have doubled in a five year period according to ABC News.

Not Covered

Road rage is a listed as an exemption in many auto insurance policies says the Insurance Information Institute.  That’s because damages resulting from road rage don’t fit the definition of an accident, but rather are due to driver behavior. If your driver initiates a road-rage claim, your company will likely be on the hook and not have any coverage.

Typical triggers for road rage include lane changes and merging. Anyone looking at loss-runs will typically see this category as being in their top five claims.

Inform Your Drivers

Let drivers know your policy about conflicts with other drivers. Inform your drivers of the need to always de-escalate any potential conflict that could develop while driving.

Although it may seem like common sense and courtesy should prevent involvement in a potential road rage situation, I would still recommend periodic road rage training.

Remind drivers not to play “traffic cop.” It’s always better from a safety perspective to yield right of way. And behaviors as speeding or aggressive driving are not what any carrier should expect from a professional driver.

Related:

Preventing Sideswipes

Than you for reading this.

Roundabout Dangers

roundabout crash

The Wheel of Misfortune

It was 9 AM on a Monday morning when the 58 year-old driver of a 2000 Freightliner pulling doubles approached the westbound Business U.S. 10 roundabout, near Midland, Michigan.

The driver didn’t slow enough before the roundabout. Losing control, he flipped the tractor and lead trailer upside down. His foot was pinned under the dash, but fortunately he was freed by the Midland Fire Department with only minor injuries.

West Business 10 roundabout crash

The Next Big Thing

Roundabouts are one of the latest ‘big things’ in road design. Roundabouts are promoted by the DOT as an overall safer means to connect traffic flows by eliminating left turns and the need to make stops.

Safer does not mean accident free. Some of the insurance carriers I work with are experiencing some large claims involving roundabouts, and motor carriers are advised to develop new driver training objectives for negotiating roundabouts.

What is a Roundabout?

A roundabout consists of a central island, usually surrounded by an apron (truck apron), and one to two lane carriageway (circulatory roadway). The spokes or lanes of the carriageway (the legs) are divided by splitter islands.

Parts of a roundabout

Other Features

  • Traffic travels counterclockwise around the center island.
  • Roundabouts come in all shapes and sizes, not only circular. Some are oval-shaped, teardrop-shaped, peanut-shaped, and dogbone-shaped.
  • Some have as few as three legs. Others as many as six.
  • Vehicles entering the roundabout need to yield the right of way to traffic already circulating, and to pedestrians, and bicyclists.
  • Traffic already inside the carriageway or circulatory roadway will always keep moving in the roundabout. This traffic has the right-of-way.

While there are now over two-dozen roundabouts in the Kansas City area alone, it seems like very few drivers know how to use them properly.  Phillip B. Grubaugh, Esq.

No Excuses!

Drivers of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) need basic training on roundabouts. The duration, scope of this training will depend on their area of service and the types of roundabouts they will encounter.

Roundabouts have been used for years in the UK and Europe. Studies have found articulated vehicles are more prone to over turning in roundabouts.

Trucks and CMVs overturn for two main reasons: the vehicle is going too fast or the driver turns too quickly, usually resulting in loss of control.

While roundabouts can be safer, drivers need to drive safer as vehicles are close together and events can happen quickly in a roundabout.

Inadequate surveillance is one of the top 10 factors in truck crashes, according to the DOT. Drivers miss cues or are distracted and are not able to properly respond. Generally, roundabouts or traffic circles will have a sign or two before their placement showing its design or type.  The U.S. DOT recommends that this signage be modified to reflect the number and alignment of approaches. Other signs warn drivers to stay right, advise of an appropriate speed, and to yield the right of way.

Traveling too fast for conditions is another of the top 10 factors is truck crashes. A key characteristic of the roundabout is a slower than normal speed, usually 20 miles per hour or lower. Sometimes the posted speed may be in the 30 to 35 MPH range. But because the roundabout is, well, round or circular by definition, CMV drivers need to drive 10 miles per hour under that speed.

Avoid Conflicts

CMV drivers in a roundabout also need to be mindful of:

  • Following too close
  • Familiarity with the roadway
  • Illegal maneuvers (other vehicles suddenly stopping or swerving)
  • Yielding to pedestrians and bicyclists
  • Other vehicles next to them or attempting to pass

I would further recommend motor carriers incorporate a roundabout on the driver’s road test.

Love them or hate them, roundabouts are a fact of modern driving and we might as well get used to them . . .

Resource: How to Drive a Multi-Lane Roundabout (Semi-trucks with Trailers) WI-DOT

Thank you for reading this.

Safety Leadership Starts Here

Leading People Safely

If you are a leader who wants to do things right, Leading People Safely will help you become a better leader. Better yet, if you are a safety consultant, safety manager, work in loss control or risk management, this book will give you a practical framework or model to help setup a cutting-edge safety program.

Fielkow and Schultz’s central thesis is that an organization needs a strong “culture of prevention” to operate safely. “‘Safety’ is not a department.” And it should be not the function of the safety department to assume the responsibilities of management.

Fielkow and Schultz point out that management generally scores itself high on safety leadership—but the front-line workforce would often beg to differ. Leading People Safely presents a number of practical tools to help align perception and reality.

Leading People Safely

The quickest way to clear a room is to mention the words ‘safety’ or ‘leadership.’ The most common excuse is, “Really great ideas, but they won’t work here.” Fielkow and Schultz might retort, “Then try building a safety culture, not a cost culture.” (Chap. 1 & 2) We learn in Chap. 3 there are some things money can’t buy: Culture drives happiness. Culture is based on the 3 Ts: Treatment, Transparency and Trust to ensure employee engagement. To know safety, one must know accountability (Chap. 4), in all its flavors, on an individual level, organizational level, and pee-to-peer level. We’re not talking about compliance (Chap. 5), but overcoming at least 12 common safety challenges under the rubric of ‘Dysfunctional Creep.’ (Chap. 6) That ends Part I of the book. Then it gets better . . .

Part II: How to Build a World-Class Safety Culture

Fielkow and Schultz jump right in with a Case Study (Chap. 7) of a real mess that needed to be cleaned up. Safety, we find, is not a department, but, rather, the responsibility of management. Safety is leader driver (Chap. 8) requires Good Leadership Habits (Chap. 9), execution of your plan (Chap. 10), and a ‘Just Culture’ (Chap. 11) to sustain it. In these days of “Nuclear Verdicts” and over-zealous regulators, learn how to protect yourself and your organization (Chap. 12) while implementing change. Like management, employees, too, must own safety (Chap. 13). Vet and mentor your workforce (Chap. 14) while developing your managers (Chap. 15) It’s all about engagement (Chap. 16-17), even engaging the family. (Chap 18)

We find small safety events and incidents can be a precursor to something major. “Severity is a matter of luck.” (Chap. 19) Always do a Root-Cause Analysis. (Chap. 20). Learn how to build a safety “brand” inside your organization. (Chap. 21) Let employees write their own handbook. (Chap. 22), to help against “Normalization of Deviance,” (Chap. 23) On day one, have them sign a “Culture Contract” (Chap 24), specific to how your culture operates. Take advantage of new safety technologies (Chap. 25)

But any organization can start to wander off course, and when it does, sometimes a “Shock and Awe” move can put it back on track. (Chap. 26). Finally, help your workforce to develop a list of your organization’s Life-Critical Rules (Chap. 27).

Thank you for reading this.

Disclaimer: I was provided a review copy by one of the authors.

Mindful . . . or Mindless Driving?

collide

Driving on Autopilot

You probably have heard the stories . . .  Drivers not remembering a thing on how they arrived in another city or state.  Or driving several times in the loop around Indianapolis in a mental haze, after missing their exit . . .

Psychologist Dr Ellen Langer calls this state “mindlessness,” a kind of autopilot. Langer believes mindlessness can be a learned behavior. Mindlessness is also stress inducing.

How so?

First, there is a confusion in being mindful—the opposite of mindlessness—with being stressed, according to Langer. Stress is when you feel “stuck in a rut,” says Langer, while mindfulness is how you feel when at play.

Secondly, stress can come from certainty. You expect something to happen, you are certain it will happen . . . and it doesn’t happen. It could be a vehicle signalling to the right—then swerving to the left in front of you. It could be traffic coming to an unexpected stop, etc.

If we feel really stressed about a situation, this ‘stressor’ can trigger the “fight-or-flight” response, resulting in adrenaline and cortisol to surge throughout the body.

The key is not to try to avoid stressful situations. The key is to be more mindful, to redirect our thoughts, to quiet our minds and the stress response.

What is Mindfulness?

“Mindfulness, as I study it, is a simple process of noticing new things.” Dr Ellen Langer

Mindfulness results in not only less stress, but higher levels of productivity and even creativity.  As an added bonus—you not only feel better, but younger.

Mindfulness, in essence, is just mind training.  Maria Gonzalez, MBA, Mindful Leadership

Mindfulness means to be aware and to live in the present.

Where are we, if we are not “here and now,” in the present moment?

If we’re not being mindful of the present, we are either remembering something (the past) or engaging in fantasy (the future). In driving, this can be dangerous.

Some of my worse driving experiences have occurred when I did not practice mindful driving, including almost running the same red light two nights in a row, and pulling out into oncoming traffic. Not good. The funny thing is . . . I can’t recall now what was so important that I risked my own life and the lives of others.

Another time, in a rush to catch a plane to a safety conference, I nicked my front bumper backing out of the parking stall. Looking back, it was pure mindlessness . . .

Practicing Mindfulness In Driving

• Acknowledge the intention that you will practice mindful driving at the start of the trip.

• As you drive, be alert of three things:

  • What you see: Are you watching the road, the mirrors, the instruments?
  • What you hear: Are you listening to the sounds of the road? The vehicle? (Mindful Driving)
  • Yourself: Are you staying alert? Are you tired or bored?

For most of us, our mind will tend to wander after driving for a while, unless we make an effort to rein it in. We want to ponder on past difficulties or future challenges, and focus less and less on driving.

Mindfulness and mindful driving are not a set of skills that can be learned in a session or two, but take time to incorporate into our daily driving routine. Make the self-investment in being more mindful in everything you do.

Thank you for reading this.

If You See Orange Barrels . . . It’s a Work Zone

construction zone

Winter . . . and Construction

In Michigan, the local saying goes, there are only two distinct seasons . . . winter and construction.

Most drivers know when it’s winter, but some drivers seem to be confused as to when they are entering a construction zone . . .

Many drivers tell Law Enforcement Officers, “I didn’t know it was a construction zone,” tweeted Sgt. John Perrine.  So here’s a heads-up:

TIP— If you see orange barrels it’s a work zone. Sgt. John Perrine

Many states double fines and “points” for traffic infractions in a construction work zone. Avoiding a ticket, however, should be the least of our considerations; we want to be safe and make sure everyone else is safe, too.

Because there can be distractions and a lot happening at the same time, construction zones can be dangerous and deadly. The Federal Highway Administration (FHA) reminds us in the last 5 years:

  • 4,400 persons died (85 percent of which was the driver or passenger) in work zones
  • 200,000 persons were injured
  • A fatal work-zone collision involving a truck occurs every 3 days

Statistics from work-zone crashes show:

  • 47% of fatal rural work-zone collision involve trucks
  • 49% of fatal truck-involved work-zone collisions involve a truck running into something or someone, and
  • 30% of fatal truck-involved work-zone collisions involve driver distraction.

The most common type of work zone crash is the rear-end collision. Drivers are following too closely or not paying attention.

Countermeasures

• Keep a good following distance and be ready to suddenly stop.

• Look for other vehicles trying to merge late into the lane.

• Some states enforce the zipper merge.

• Stay under the posted speed limit.

• Expect the unexpected. People will make mistakes.

• Turn the radio off and CB down.

• Limit conversations.

• In bad weather, slow down and leave extra following distance.

• Be mindful of flaggers and signage.

• Out east, cars will (illegally) pass your truck by driving on the shoulder.

• Allow extra drive time in your schedule.

• Don’t make ANY unnecessary lane changes.

• Keep your headlights on.

• Drive defensively.

My personal strategy is to avoid construction zones, if possible. If I can’t avoid them, I will try to run through the zone during off peak-traffic times. Sometimes they can’t be avoided.

Yeah . . . I’m that guy following the work-zone speed limit . . . And I hope you do, too . . .

Remember today’s tip: If you see the orange barrels, it’s a work zone.

Thank you for reading this. With thanks to Sgt. John Perrine.

 

Drivers . . . Chock Your Wheels

Roll-away_mixerReady Mix Trucks Rolls Away

A 48-year-old ready mix truck driver was fatally injured Wednesday April 13, 2016 while working under his vehicle, which passed over him when it started to move, then rolled about the length of a football field into an unoccupied house.

No one else was injured or hurt in the incident. The name of the driver was not released, but the driver was said to be well known and respected in his community.

Drivers . . . Chock Your Wheels

Did you know that all wheel chocks are not created equal?

The size and type of wheel chock used is really dependent on several factors including the vehicle’s size and weight and the angle of the road surface (slope or grade). There is actually a formula to determine maximum slope angle of a chock.

We’ll skip the math today, but keep in mind that parking on an angle greater than 10 degrees increases the risk of the vehicle rolling over the chock. The surface under the chock needs to be firm, as well, or the chock can be squashed down.

Parking on inclines greater than 30% gradient (16.6 degrees) is not recommended with wheel chocks. (Another sort of anchor may be appropriate for safety purposes.)

Wheel chocks are covered under SAE J348, but the standard itself is not helpful as it is under revision.

What To Know About Wheel Chocks

Wheel chocks are designed to supplement the parking brake. I can recall, for example, a time when trailers were not equipped with parking brakes and wheel chocks were essential to even unhook the trailer. Everybody carried 4x4s in the cab for this purpose. Today that is not the case, but there is still a place for wheel chocks, as large vehicles roll away every day, especially if parked on a grade, even a slight grade.

Trucks and trailers can roll-away, even if the parking brakes are set if:

  • brakes are out of adjustment
  • brakes are worn
  • brakes have been poorly maintained
  • a combination of the above

Brakes can easily get out of adjustment if a driver does not do his/her daily air-brake checks. Brakes that are out of adjustment are frequently cited on roadside inspections.

Automatic slack adjusters are really a misnomer, because if a driver does not fully apply the service brakes, the adjusting ratchet may not properly adjust. Most braking is light pressure (between 8 p.s.i. to 15 p.s.i on the application gauge). Rarely does a driver need to jam on the brakes during normal driving. But unless full-brake applications are made, the slack adjusters will not adjust themselves.

One way to help the automatic slack adjusters to properly adjust is to do daily pre-trip inspection brake checks: (a.) check the air brake gauges, (b.) do the Parking Brake Check or “Stall” Test, and (c.) the Air Loss or Leak-Down Test. They check (d.) the Low-air warning devices and do the (e.) Protection valves POP-OFF test.

Chock Your Wheels

So always use wheel chocks whenever:

  • parked on a grade
  • working around the truck
  • working under the truck
  • parked in high wind conditions
  • at docks (per OSHA or state rules)

Make sure the vehicle is always properly secure with wheel chocks . . . and it will be.

Thank you for reading this.

More  . . . Test Your Air Brakes

Drivers . . . Be Mindful of . . . People

Checking on the scene . . .

 

It was her first concert and the Greyhound bus dropped her off on an evening scheduled stop on U.S. 23. She called home on her cell phone, as she crossed the dark highway. She was 18 and never saw the truck . . .

The numbers are still coming in for 2015, but everything so far points to last year as being one of the most dangerous years for pedestrians says the Insurance Journal. It is estimated that about 15% of fatalities in 2015 were pedestrians. About a decade ago the average was about 10% to 11% per year.

About 42% of the pedestrian fatalities occurred in the states with large metropolitan centers: California, Florida, Texas and New York.

But as the photo below shows, pedestrians can show up where you least expect them.

Pedestrian on expressway

A truck dashcam catches a pedestrian strolling along an expressway.

 

There seem to be blind people out there trying to drive, and there are blind people out there trying to walk. Turn on your lights so they can see you coming. Dress in contrast to the pavement so the drivers can see you.  Frances Eckhardt, Vancouver

Cellphone-Distracted Walking

In 2015 the National Safety Council (NSC) added a new category called cellphone-distracted walking when tracking unintentional deaths and injuries. NSC estimates that between 2000 and 2011 more than 11,000 people were injured while walking and talking on their phones.

“Cellphone use reduces situational awareness. You are unaware that you are unaware. Peripheral vision drops by 10 percent when you’re using a mobile device, enough to miss a traffic light or an oncoming car. That pulls our attention away and results in unsafe behavior.” Lisa Kons,  Minnesota Safety Council.

So many people walking and texting has led to a new word —petextrian. People are literally bumping into things, not watching where they are going, while interacting with their electronic devices.

Countermeasures

(A countermeasure is a measure or action taken to counter or offset another one.)

There is an interesting phenomenon every commercial truck driver notices sooner or later in their career. . . the larger the truck you drive, the more invisible it seems to become.

The only effective solution to this cloak of invisibility are basic defensive driving practices such as those of the Smith System:

  • Aim High In Steering ® — Looking further ahead than other drivers
  • Get The Big Picture ® — Seeing more around you than other drivers
  • Keep Your Eyes Moving ® — Being more aware than other drivers
  • Leave Yourself An Out ® — Positioning in traffic better than other drivers
  • Make Sure They See You ® — Making yourself more visible than other drivers

Learning to effectively manage time and space is the key to defensive driving. For example, if you don’t have six seconds following distance, the vehicle ahead might be able to swerve around someone, but you will not have enough time to anticipate the danger and respond in an appropriate manner.

Another tool is the active practice of mindfulness while driving: focusing on one thing in the moment.

  • Set all distractions aside
  • Give driving your full attention
  • Do not to judge anything that you’re experiencing. It is what it is.
  • Enjoy the journey.

Thank you for reading this.

More: Preventing Roll-overs of Pedestrians

How can Pedestrian Collisions be Prevented?

 

 

Rollaways . . . Runaways . . . Driveoffs . . .

Anthony Dellegrazie kneels over the covered body his dad, in Brooklyn on Monday.

The Case of the Unsecured Vehicle . . .

A truck driver stopped his tractor-trailer to drop off lunch to a fellow worker. Noticing the truck had started to roll away, he attempted to get back in the vehicle and during the attempt, the 26 year old father of two was fatally injured.

While these type of collisions are sometimes referred to as “freak accidents,” they are not that uncommon. An online search for “driver killed trying to stop rolling truck” shows over 27 million results . . .

Countermeasures

A countermeasure is defined as a measure or action taken to counter or offset another one.

Drivers should be in the habit of a following what some call the Cockpit Exit Routine.

(1) Set the brakes or check that the brakes have been set. To set or check the air brakes,pull the yellow knob on the dash. This will also automatically deploy the trailer air brakes.

(2) Ensure the ignition key is in the “off” position. On average, a truck key is left in the “on/ accessory-position” at least once a year, resulting in a drained battery (and about a $225 average service call).

(3) Check that the turn signal or emergency lights are off.

(4) Check a second time that the air brakes have been set  by pulling on the yellow knob again.

(5) Once outside, take a final glance back at the truck, making sure no lights have been left on. Set wheel chocks if the vehicle is parked on an incline.

Drivers should not attempt to chase or stop a rolling truck. I am not aware of any situations where such an attempt made the situation better. More than likely, a panicked attempt to stop a truck already in motion will result in a serious injury or worse.

Stay cool. Stay calm. Follow the Cockpit Exit Routine.

Driveoffs

The NY Post reported a tragedy occurred early this week when someone stole Phil Dellegrazie’s brand-new flatbed truck while he was loading it by his metal shop in Brooklyn. After confronting the man at an intersection, the suspect ran over and killed Mr. Dellegrazie, who was well-liked and respected by the local community.

If your vehicle is being stolen, it’s hard to stop yourself from reacting. But the key thing is to respond, not react.

The best response is to call the police, then your insurance company. They deal with this everyday. One vehicle is stolen every minute, nationally.

Countermeasures

According to NHTSA  up to half of stolen vehicles are a result of oversights or mistakes made by the driver . . .

  • Always lock the vehicle, taking the keys with you
  • Avoid keeping a spare key hidden in or on the vehicle.
  • Always lock the door and roll up the windows.
  • Never leave the vehicle running.

Thank you for reading this.

 

 

Truck crash scams: One More Reason for an “Event Recording Device?”

preventing fraudCrunch Time!

Insurance fraud is any act committed with the intent to obtain a fraudulent outcome from an insurance process.

The incidences of cars pulling in front of trucks to intentionally collide are increasing. Many motor carriers are not aware of this growing problem. These scams are not only dangerous, but raise everyone’s insurance premiums.

Fact:  Since 2008 car-semitrailer insurance fraud has grown 24 percent nationwide.

Called a “staged wreck,” it involves a car slowing down or suddenly stopping in front of a truck or tractor-trailer so it is rear-ended. Shortly after an insurance claim is filed against the motor carrier.

Staged accidents are schemes in which an accident is predetermined to occur on a vehicle. The schemes are organized by rings and the culprits move from one area to another. They often use the same vehicle over and over, which is sometimes what causes their scheme to be uncovered. Insurance Fraud Handbook

 

Insurance Fraud Countermeasures

How can a driver or motor carrier protect themselves against insurance fraud?

The number one tool to fight insurance fraud is awareness of the problem, to avoid being victimized by the scammers.

• Report suspected fraud to your insurance company. More than 4 of 5 insurers have trained insurance fraud investigators.

• Drivers should never tailgate and learn to watch out for a setup.

Swoop and squat: A suspect vehicle suddenly swoops in front of you and jams on the brakes, causing a rear-end collision.

Drive down: You’re trying to merge into traffic, and a dishonest driver slows down and waves you forward. He then crashes into your vehicle, but denies waving you into traffic and blames the accident on you. Crooked drivers may also wave you out of a parking space with the same come-on.

Sideswipe: Be careful if you’re driving in the inner lane of a dual left-turn lane at a busy intersection. Crooks will deliberately ram you if you drift into the outer lane while turning. Coalition Against Insurance Fraud

All drivers need to be well versed on defensive driving practices and techniques. If a crash does happen, be observant.

• Never tailgate : allow plenty of space between your car and the car ahead of you. This will give you ample time to stop if the lead car suddenly jams on its brakes.

• Look beyond the car in front of you while driving. Apply your brakes if you see traffic slowing.

• Count how many passengers were in the other vehicle if you’re in a collision. Get their names, phone numbers and driver’s license : more people may file claims than were in the car. Also get the car’s license number. Note: Keep a pen and paper in your glove compartment so you’re always ready.

• How do the passengers behave? Did they stand around and joke, but suddenly act “injured” when the police arrived?

• Take cell-phone pictures of the other car, the damage it received — and the passengers.

• Call the police to the scene. Get a police report with the officer’s name, even for minor damage. If the police report notes just a small dent or scratch, it’ll be harder for crooks to later claim serious injuries or car damage.

• Get involved if you’re a witness. Watch for the warning signs of a scam, and help the honest victim with details. Coalition Against Insurance Fraud

Motor carriers are also installing Event Recording Devices to capture crash details on video. One large motor carrier will install over 6,000 devices in its fleet.

Will your company be the next victim?

Thank you for reading this.

Solving the Truck Parking Problem

positioning the vehicle

What Do You Want: A Job . . . or a Position?

po·si·tion
pəˈziSH(ə)n/
noun
– a particular way in which someone or something is placed or arranged.

What, you might ask, does a Rolls Royce have to do with truck parking?

Years ago when putting together a curriculum for training truck drivers I did research on some of the top driving schools in the world. What made them the best? What did they do?Everyone knows that Rolls Royce is one of the best cars in the world. Even that People’s Revolutionary Lenin took possession of a Rolls, no doubt in the name of the people. One of the things I came to find out was that professional Rolls Royce drivers never park their vehicle — they always position the car. 

 

While that might be a subtle nuance, professional Rolls drivers are informed (indoctrinated) that how the vehicle is parked (errr— positioned) should make a difference.

 

With new truck prices now often exceeding the price of a Rolls, one would think that the idea should catch on. Parking stress is one of the top concerns of many truck drivers. Parking lots can become quickly congested and there is always the element of danger when large trucks try to maneuver around each other in tight spaces. Collisions, injuries and even fatalities are bound to occur.

But there’s another emerging problem that goes beyond a lack of parking spaces —  there are some drivers who just don’t get it. They simply don’t know how to park.
Here’s an example . . .
over the line
 These two trucks in the middle in the next photo are angled so another truck cannot park next to them. The two middle trucks are taking up at least four parking spaces . . .
 bad positioning

This was recently shot at a packed truck stop by V-blogger Trucker Josh,  who gave his two cents on the matter . . .

What’s up with this?
That is skill to take up five spots with two trucks. Bravo.
Don’t be those guys.
Get out of your truck . . .
Every time I park, I walk around my truck and I walk away from it and I look at the whole thing from a distance. I ask myself a few questions . . .
1. Am I straight?
2. Am I between the lines?
3. If I can’t see the lines, I imagine lines and ask myself again, Am I between my imaginary lines?
4. Can everyone else around me get out, so I won’t get woken up at 4 in the morning when they want to leave? Can they get out? Are they going to hit me when they get out?
These are all questions that I ask myself as I am walking around the truck looking at my parking . . . Then, if I can’t see the lines, I look at the other trucks that are parked there, then imagine lines . . .

 

And that is how one professional driver positions his truck . . .

 

If positioning was done properly, I believe we could potentially solve some of the parking problems drivers are experiencing. Drivers need to know how to properly position their vehicles without being a hazard to the trucks next to them and, most of all, without taking up two or even three desperately needed parking spots. 

Other Parking Horrors . . .

Here are two more bad parking examples . . .
Bobtail backed over curb.

Bobtail backed over curb.

 A tractor trailer is parked tightly against the curb . . .
Buffing the curb.

Tires scrubbing hard against the curb. Not a good thing . . .

There are a number of other tricks of the trade when it comes to positioning a truck or tractor trailer.
  • Pulling forward tight against a curb can lock the shifter of a truck with an automatic transmission.
  • There are some places a truck should never park . . . like on ramps and expressways. It’s automatic termination, for example, for Landstar drivers who violate that company policy.
  • Know emergency stopping procedures. One recent lawsuit was settled for over $2.5 million when a driver did not put on his four-ways and set-up his triangles . . . We all pay for this kind of foolishness in higher insurance premiums.

Positioning the vehicle correctly every time does make a big difference.

Thank you for reading this.

Accidentally— On Purpose: The Angry Truck Driver

 

Angry truck driver

This truck driver laid on the horn before getting dangerously close to the vehicle ahead and locking up his brakes — all caught on video camera.

Danny Leonardo Gonzalez, 50, says the reason he ran a dozen vehicles, including two loaded school buses, off of the northbound lanes of I-65, near exit 112 at 6:30 AM Friday morning (February 12, 2016), was because he snapped.

Gonzalez hit one truck, then repeatedly rammed a Cadillac, pushing it out of the way. After leaving I-65 at exit 121, “he allegedly ran over street signs and a stop sign, before his truck became stuck in a field,” according to WDRB. He was ordered out of the truck at gunpoint and placed under arrest.

“He looked like ‘this is my road and I’m taking it,’” said one of the bus drivers who swerved out of his way.

Gonzalez  was “charged with wanton endangerment, criminal mischief and leaving the scene of an accident.” A puppy was found in the truck, resulting in an additional investigation of animal cruelty.

Who is the Angry Truck Driver?

The angry or “high-anger” truck driver is part of American lore. There are angry truck driver jokes, even angry truck driver video games.

Often known as road rage, it’s a problem that seems to be increasing year to year and is responsible for hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries. Road rage is:

When a driver “commits moving traffic offenses so as to endanger other persons or property; an assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger of one motor vehicle on the operator or passengers of another motor vehicle”. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

 

One study by psychologist Jerry Deffenbacher, PhD, found high-anger drivers:

  • Engage in hostile, aggressive thinking. High-anger drivers report more judgmental and disbelieving thoughts about other drivers than low-anger drivers do. For example, they’re more likely to insult other drivers or state disbelief about the way others drive. They also have more vengeful and retaliatory thoughts about other drivers, sometimes plotting ways to physically harm them.
  • Take more risks on the road. High-anger drivers in his studies report more risky behavior in the prior three months than low-anger drivers do. They more often speed–usually 10 to 20 miles per hour over the speed limit–rapidly switch lanes, tailgate and enter an intersection when a light turns red.
  • Get angry faster and behave more aggressively. High-anger drivers most commonly reported the following aggressive behaviors: swearing or name-calling, driving while angry, yelling at the driver or honking in anger. They were angry slightly more than two times a day and averaged just over two aggressive behaviors per day, whereas low-anger drivers were angry slightly less than once per day and averaged less than one aggressive behavior per day. This pattern held for low- and high-anger drivers who drove equally as often and an equivalent number of miles.
  • Have more accidents. In driving simulations, high-anger drivers have twice as many car accidents–either from a collision with another vehicle or off-road crash. They also report more near-accidents and receive more speeding tickets. However, the two groups are equal in the number of accidents they have that involve major injuries; Deffenbacher speculated that’s because these types of crashes are a rare occurrence anyway.
  • Experience more trait anger, anxiety and impulsiveness. High-anger drivers are more likely to get in a car angry, which may stem from work or home stress. They generally tend to express anger in more outward and less controlled ways as well as react impulsively.

Real Life Examples Abound

As anyone with a cell-phone can make a video, there are many behavioral examples of angry truck drivers on social media platforms such as YouTube or Vimeo. They are simply out of control and have no control of their own behavior or of how they operate their vehicle.

But even more troubling is the fact that even when they have not reached their flash-point or trigger spot, high-anger drivers drive aggressively, speed excessively, drive impulsively, have more collisions and rack up more tickets. They may confront and even try to punish other drivers by insults or aggressive driving.

How to Help the High-Anger Truck Driver

Use any available vehicle telematics to monitor for sudden braking or erratic driving.

Investigate any collision, no matter how small.

Pay attention to outside reports of aggressive driving, verbal confrontations with other drivers, or a string of tickets or collisions.

Have crystal-clear policies and standards in place covering driver expectations. (This is a big problem area in my opinion).

Do thorough background investigations and ask former employers if they would ever hire the driver again.

*Indoctrinate drivers to:

  • Allow more travel time to get to your destination. It reduces stress dramatically.
  • Come to a full stop at red lights and stop signs.
  • Never run yellow lights.
  • Let other drivers merge with you.
  • Obey posted speed limits.
  • Don’t ever follow other drivers too closely.
  • Resist the temptation to teach someone “a lesson.”
  • Concentrate on driving, not on any electronic devices, the radio, passengers, eating, or other distractions.
  • Remember that you can’t control traffic, but you can control yourself, your driving, and your emotions.

*FHWA Smooth Operator Tipsheet

Thank you for reading this.

 

 

 

 

 

Backing Tragedy Unfolds When Truck Driver Stops to Help

backing accident

Palm Coast, FL— A dump truck driver stopped to help free a man’s pickup stuck in the dirt off the side of the Forest Grove Drive and killed both the 29-year-old driver and a 22 year-old pregnant woman.

The double fatality happened late Thursday night (Feb. 11, 2016) at about 10:30 PM. When several tries to free the pickup failed, the dump truck backed up and may have unknowingly killed the two young people. The dump truck driver left the scene and was flagged down about a mile up the road. The dump driver was taken to a local hospital for chest pains. Charges against the dump truck driver are pending, according to WESH-NBC.

The Problem

Fatalities and injuries in backing crashes are tracked by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT).

“A backover occurs when a driver reverses into and injures or kills a nonoccupant such as a pedestrian or a bicyclist.” NHTSA

Backovers that occur on a public roadway are called traffic backovers. Backovers not on a public roadway, for example, in a driveway or in a parking lot are called nontraffic backovers and these type of backovers are 37 percent of all off-highway fatalities (or about one person every workday — about 250 per year).

The true number of people injured and killed in nontraffic backover events is most likely higher, as some public safety departments are not allowed to respond to incidents occurring on private property.

Fact: Backing collisions are 100 percent preventable.

Preventing Backing Collisions

Research in backing collisions tells us two things:

  1. The main cause of all backing accidents is human error. 
  2. Organizations with motor vehicles need to develop special programs to help prevent backing collisions

While we will never be able to prevent all human error, driver errors can be mitigated by safety training and indoctrination and a strong safety culture.

In talking with small fleet owners, I have never had the topic of backing training brought up by the fleet owner. I’ve seen good on-site backing practices, but it’s hard to attribute one or two observations to a good safety culture or to the safe practices of one or two drivers.

Whether one operates on-road or off-road, the procedures for backing are always the same: insure the path is clear, use a spotter, stop and re-check things if there is any doubt.

A Personal Tragedy

I take safe backing personally. A tragic backing accident happened many years ago (before I was born) at my father’s trucking company. I learned to spot semi-trucks before I knew my ABC’s. Safety is my primary concern in writing these blogs. I know I oft repeat myself, but the reason is so the next generation of drivers and fleet owners don’t have to repeat the same tragic mistakes, year, after year, after year.

Unfortunately, as the above backing double-fatality illustrates, not everyone is getting the message and there is room for improvement. Every year hundreds are killed and thousands injured in backing incidents and collisions. (Several news media outlets called it a “freak accident.” Really?)

Not enough attention is paid to backing safely. Part of the problem may be in training (endless repetition on the backing course where the driver may check his path once, if at all), and lack of refresher backing training. Watch drivers back at truck stops. It’s scary.

Proper and safe backing is something that needs to be talked about with drivers at least once a year, if not  more, in my opinion.

Thank you for reading this.

More . . . You Want Me to do Whaaat? Preventing Truck Backing Collisions

 

Trucks vrs Bikes: No Winners . . .

Amelie Le Moullac's bicycle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bicyclists was following the rules of the road when she approached the intersection. The 26,000 GVWR truck came up from behind, overtook the 24 year old female rider and hit the bicycle as the truck made a right turn, resulting in a fatal collision.

The truck driver made an unsafe lane change, without signalling, according to a witness— and later retrieved video of the collision. After the collision, the driver called his company— before calling 911.

Merging into the bike lane and making a right turn is the number one question test-takers get wrong on the California Department of Motor Vehicles driver’s license test.

Merging into the bike lane, however, should be logical to any driver, who knows what a solid line (don’t cross except to park) and a dashed line (merge over when safe) mean.

Bike lanes

The above turn on the left is known as a “hook” and should be avoided.

A motor vehicle — regardless of size — when making a right turn, should always turn right from the curb. This avoids “conflict” (collisions) with bicycles and for larger vehicles like tractor-trailers blocks cars from getting between the truck and the curb (right turn squeeze-play).

Bicyclists have the right-of-way in a bike lane. Right-turning drivers need to to safely merge into the bike lane where the solid line becomes dashed, and then yield to bicyclists.

But many people are confused on this point. (2 minute KRON video on YouTube)

This confusion on Bike-Lane rules of the road may have one reason prosecutors declined to charge the truck driver with vehicular homicide or any criminal charges in the death of the bicyclist.

In January 2015 a jury awarded her family a $4 million dollar judgement against the truck driver and his company. The attorney for the family noted the 47 year-old truck driver was not required to have a CDL license, but suggested this be changed and everyone driving larger vehicles have training in their safe operation.

Key Lessons

Everyone has the right to use or cross the roadway if they are following the rules of the road. In fact, in cities like San Francisco, it’s illegal to ride on the sidewalk if you are over the age of 13. (SF Transportation Code Sec. 7.2.12)

Bicycles can leave the bike lane if they feel it is safer for them. If the bicyclist feels safer outside the bike lane, they can ride in other vehicle travel lanes. Motor vehicles should not crowd the bicycle. Some states have a three-foot rule.

As of December 2015, 26 states—Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Virginia, Utah, West Virginia,  Wisconsin and Wyoming—and the District of Columbia have enacted 3-feet passing laws.

Two states have laws that go beyond a 3-feet passing law. Pennsylvania has a 4-feet passing law. South Dakota enacted a two-tiered passing law in 2015; with a three foot passing requirement on roads with posted speeds of thirty-five miles per hour or less and a minimum of six feet separation for roads with speed limits greater than thirty five miles per hour.  In 9 other states there are general laws that provide that motorists must pass at a “safe distance.” These laws typically state that vehicles must pass bicyclists at a safe distance and speed; Montana’s law, for example, requires a motorist to “overtake and pass a person riding a bicycle only when the operator of the motor vehicle can do so safely without endangering the person riding the bicycle.  National Conference of State Legislatures

Drivers need to become knowledgeable on the rules of the road regarding sharing the road with bicycles.

Thank you for reading this.

Related blogs: Preventing Roll-overs of Pedestrians

How can Pedestrian Collisions be Prevented?

That Well-Intentioned “All-Clear” Wave

X-ray of cyclist hit by truck given the "all clear" wave.

X-ray of a cyclist who was hit by truck given the “all clear” wave.

It happens time and time again. You know the situation. Two drivers stop at an intersection, and one waves the other on. The second driver see the “all clear” wave and takes right of way, and then bang! — collides with a person, cyclist or another vehicle.

Who’s at fault?

The answer may surprise you.

Fault really depends in which state the collision occurs . . . and may even be determined on a case-by-case basis. In the collision with the cyclist (photo above), the driver who gave the “all clear” wave was found by an Oregon jury to be 35 percent responsible for the crash. After the collision, the bicyclist went into cardiac arrest and stopped breathing, and would have died had a doctor not been nearby. The bicyclist got twelve screws and a plate, four broken ribs, a broken scapula, punctured lung and a concussion, and sued both the driver in the truck-bike collision and his company, and the driver who gave the “wave” (and his company), for $670,000 in damages. 

Trucks Can Hide Traffic

Because commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) are large, they can obscure an on-coming vehicle at intersections.  If a CMV-driver waves a car on, the car may do something the truck driver didn’t expect, like pulling into traffic, cyclists or pedestrians who have the legal right-of-way. This shouldn’t happen, but it frequently does.

Another potential “conflict” occurs when a tractor-trailer swings into the oncoming lane to make a right turn. If not timed correctly, traffic can back up quickly. If the tractor-trailer driver waves a car around his truck, there is no telling how the car driver might respond.

Giving an “all clear” wave can result in serious injury to others on the road.

Giving an “all clear” wave can subject well-intentioned drivers to liability.

What the Law Says

Gary Wickert, Esq., and attorney with with Matthiesen, Wickert & Lehrer, and expert on insurance subrogation, wrote an article called Punishing Common Courtesy in Claims Journal.

A good argument can be made that “do-gooders” who bring traffic to a complete stop to wave somebody into the roadway create a dangerous blind spot for the merging vehicle and a very hazardous situation for all vehicles in the vicinity. This is especially true when the vehicle that comes to a stop is a large SUV or truck. Nobody wants to put their life in the hands of some well-intentioned motorist, and it is hard to precisely interpret a “wave.” Does the wave mean that it is clear to pull across both lanes of traffic or simply to pull in front of the stopped vehicle and proceed in the same direction? The “wave” usually consists of a signal which can be interpreted as “it’s clear to cross the street.” This debate makes for interesting bar chat, but when tragedy results from good intentions, lawyers enter the conversation. And, if the person attempting to cross the street is a pedestrian or if you extend the liability to a driver’s signaling that it is clear for a vehicle behind him to pass, when it isn’t, the liability for having a big heart can be significant.

 

Drivers Need to Know . . .

A driver signaling “all clear” can create a traffic hazard — resulting in personal injury or death.

A driver has no obligation to engage in signalling other drivers or “directing traffic.” That’s why we have the “rules of the road.”

A driver “directing traffic” assumes the same level of liability as a police officer does when directing traffic.

Thank you for stopping by.

Anatomy of a Fatal Truck Crash

Bokelman crash

Chicago, IL — On Friday, January 22, 2016 Andrew Bokelman, 25 plead guilty in a Cook County court to to three charges — all felonies — of operating a commercial vehicle while impaired or fatigued, filing a false log to conceal hours worked, and working longer than a 14-hour period allowed by law.

Background

Shortly after 11:00 PM, on Thursday, March 28, 2013 Bokelman was traveling on on I-294, south of Willow Road near Northbrook, IL, when his tractor-trailer drifted to the left and then the left shoulder of the south-bound lanes.

Illinois State Trooper James Sauter was parked on the left shoulder and was rear-ended by Bokelman’s rig, and pushed over 500 feet, resulting in a fire. Although Bokelman attempted to help trooper Sauter, he was not able to because of the flames. A witness reported Bokelman had never touched his brakes prior to impact.

Bokelman received his commercial driver’s license (CDL) about six months before the crash.

Bokelman was driving from Waukesha, Wis., to Louisville, Ky and had driven about two hours prior to the crash. Alcohol and drugs were not a factor in this crash.

Officer Sauter was known as a “road dog,” who enjoyed highway patrol work and helping people. Although an Illinois State Police pilot, he requested to get back on the road.

Bokelman was not charged with reckless homicide charges, because in Illinois there is no precedent for doing so in cases when a driver falls asleep at the wheel. Bokelman started his work shift at 6 AM that morning and had worked 18 hours straight. His intentions were to not drive much further before the crash. A reckless homicide conviction in Illinois carries a sentence of between two to five years in prison.

On January 27, 2014 another Illinois trooper — Douglas Balder — was seriously injured and a toll worker killed when they were struck by Renato Velasquez’s tractor-trailer when Velasquez reportedly fell asleep. Velasquez had been driving over 28 hours on 3 1/2 hours of sleep.

Bokelman was sentenced to two years in prison but will be released in about a year due to time already served. The insurance company for Bokelman’s employer paid a $10 Million settlement to trooper Sauter’s wife.

There were some people not satisfied with Bokelman’s two-year sentence. They say it sends the wrong message, that it cheapens the lives of law enforcement.

Lessons Learned — Indoctrinate your drivers.

Running until you are dog-tired and nodding off at the wheel is simply knuckle-headed stuff. Stuff — that should never happen. But it keeps happening — again and again and again.

Start with the cold truth: Log violations and falsification are felonious. You can’t do worse than that.

Train drivers to protect themselves. The best protection is found in following the rules. The only driver protection is in following the rules. As I like to tell drivers — the insurance is on the truck.

Sure — bad things can happen to good people. Even good people following the rules. But by following the rules, a driver has what is known as a defense. The rules are there to protect everyone including the driver.

Somehow that message is not getting out there.

Something is wrong— very wrong when drivers are running 18 to 28 hour shifts at a stretch. It’s not productive. It’s not healthy. In fact, very quickly, it can and does turn counter-productive.

Back in the day, it was common practice to park and take a short nap if a driver felt it was needed. This was an unwritten rule in driving— when you reached your limit, stop, rest, and recharge before continuing.

It Gets Worse

The Illinois officer killed on the road before trooper Sauter, trooper Kyle Deatherage, was killed by a tractor-trailer driver who suffered from a medical condition that caused a loss of consciousness. The driver was allegedly in a state of unconsciousness when he struck and killed trooper Deatherage who was conducting a routine traffic stop on the roadside.

Another truck driver who should not have been on the road. Another unnecessary fatal collision. Trooper Kyle Deatherage won’t be there for his wife and kids . . .

Action Summary

Train and indoctrinate your drivers to protect themselves by knowing the rules, following the rules and documenting what they do.

Thank you for reading this.

 

Rolling Roadblocks by Trucks: Illegal or Not?

rolling roadblock

What Are Rolling Roadblocks?

Rolling roadblocks are a name for a tactic that has been used by police to control and slow down traffic.  An officer may weave across the lanes from side to side, or, the preferred method is to have the patrol cars drive abreast, one in each respective lane.

A rolling roadblock by police typically slows traffic while roadwork is being done, or a hazard is present on the roadway, ranging from a tire casing across a lane to a major collision scene.

Are trucks legally allowed to block traffic with a rolling roadblock?

Traffic laws in the U.S. are enforced by their respective states. One of the basic rules of driving is that slower traffic should stay to the right, unless passing. Some states ban trucks in the left lane.

PA § 3301.  Driving on right side of roadway.

(a)  General rule.–Upon all roadways of sufficient width, a vehicle shall be driven upon the right half of the roadway

Pennsylvania, for example, like many states, recognizes a vehicle would be in the left lane if:

  • Overtaking and passing another vehicle
  • An obstruction exists in the right lane
  • An official traffic-control devices block the right lane
  • Upon a roadway restricted to one-way traffic
  • Making a left turn or following a left-leading

Driving in the left lane (without returning to the right lane when it is safe to do so) is considered a civil infraction (a driver will be fined and pay court costs) under (MCL 257.634 in Michigan.

Another issue to take into consideration is the fact that what is not enforced in one state, may be enforced in another state or even in a different part of the same state.

Trucks engaging in a rolling roadblock could be ticketed for:

  • impeding traffic (OH)
  • obstructing traffic (PA)
  • improper passing
  • improper lane use (MI)

Key Driver Indoctrination Points

Truck drivers should not participate in creating rolling roadblocks.

Law enforcement may consider a rolling roadblock, even with good intention, the same as drivers taking traffic control into their own hands — an illegal act.

Motorcycles have been encouraged by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation to use the shoulder for safety during expressway slowdowns. Lane splitting (the practice of riding a motorcycle between clearly marked lanes) by motorcycles in slow expressway traffic is considered an “option” for motorcycles in California. Trucks should not move over in their lanes or to other lanes to impede motorcycles.

More states are encouraging merging traffic to blend together in what is known as the zipper merge.

Treat all merging traffic with common courtesy and expect other drivers to make mistakes.

Do not take right-of-way. Right of way can only be granted — never taken.

Action Summary

Train and indoctrinate your drivers about the legal consequences of engaging in rolling roadblocks.

Set clear expectations in driver handbooks and company policy (in writing) about rolling roadblocks, interacting with motorcycles and merging.

Thank you for reading this.

J Taratuta

 

John Taratuta is a trucking safety advocate and Risk Engineer.