Check Your CSA Scores

Crash Indicator BASIC

Know the Score

If for no other reason than ‘occasionally mistakes are made,’ it is a good practice to check your motor carrier safety and performance data on a regular basis—say, monthly.

What kind of mistakes? As motor carriers as tracked by their individually assigned U.S. DOT number, it is not unheard of to have another motor carrier’s violation show up under your DOT number, if someone mistakenly puts in a wrong digit of the number.

Drivers may forget to inform you of a failed roadside inspection or that they were stopped and ticketed for a traffic infraction, moving violation, or a violation of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations.

How to Check Your Score?

To check your CSA scores and profile, go to the CSA landing page.

Then, in the box under “Check Motor Carrier Safety and Performance Data,” type or paste either the name or company under which you registered with the DOT or your U.S. DOT number. This will take you to the “Overview” page.

On the Overview page, you will see your “Out of Service Rates,” expressed as a percentage, for Vehicles and Drivers. These percentages should stay under the national average.

Further down the Overview page are the individual Behavior Analysis & Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs). As a rule, these should not go above the 20 per cent line in any of the seven BASICs, of which only five are available for viewing by the general public. For insurance purposes, none of the BASICs should ever be flagged in an “Alert” status.

Below the BASICs on the Overview page is a link to your “Complete SMS Profile.” Here you will find a “Violation Summary” showing a list of violations, and a “Inspection History” showing a listing of inspections.

Study the Inspection History for new violations, any violations which may be unknown to you, or violations that may be listed here by mistake. Investigate these violations to your satisfaction.

Next is a Crash Activity Detail or a listing of vehicles “involved” in a crash. Under a new proposed method, certain crashes (deemed nonpreventable) will likely not be tracked in the future.

Study the Crash Activity Detail section to make sure it is accurate. Generally you will not find any “property” damage accidents or incidents listed here, so it may not be as complete as your insurance loss runs.

Why Bother?

The main reasons to check your CSA safety and performance data are as follows:

  1. Insurance companies are interested in the data when they underwrite policies
  2. Shippers and brokers are interested in the data in assigning loads
  3. The press and media can use this information, if your company is involved in an incident/accident/collision
  4. Mistakes can occur, and, if not corrected, can affect the above
  5. The bottom line: Your reputation is at stake. Bad data or incorrect data can lead to bad judgments about your operations

Correcting the Mistakes

In an upcoming blog we will discuss how to correct mistakes on your safety profile using DataQs.

Thank you for reading this.

Picture of John Taratuta

John Taratuta, Safety & Risk Engineer, 989-474-9599

 

 

How do I get my CSA scores down?

CSA

On December 10, 2010, a pilot enforcement program known as Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 (CSA 2010) was relaunched nationally and became Compliance, Safety, Accountability or more commonly, CSA.

The heart of CSA is the Carrier Safety Measurement System (CSMS). Another part is   the Driver Safety Measurement System (DSMS), which measures the safety of individual commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers.

The Driver Safety Measurement System is designed to identify drivers with a history of safety violations. The information is used to target enforcement when an investigator visits a motor carrier during a compliance review or other intervention. This information is not provided to the public.

The SMS is based on available roadside safety performance data. This roadside data is used to rank operational safety in six Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) and a crash involvement (Crash Indicator). Law enforcement may use rankings within these BASICs and the Crash Indicator to select organizations for further investigation or selection for additional roadside inspections. As this information is public (except for the Crash indication), anyone including shippers, insurance carriers, job candidates, etc., can look at the BASICs as well.

csa

If a certain score (or threshold) is passed, the basic may be flagged.

alerts

Flagged BASICs can result in DOT Audits or investigations that can last from several hours to several days, or even weeks, depending on the size of the fleet and the scope of the investigation. If any regulatory discrepancies are discovered during an audit or investigation, the DOT can respond in a number of ways ranging from fines, to issuing a downgraded safety rating, or “orders” to comply or to develop a safety plan.

Essentially, the results of every Roadside Inspection (RI) are important because the safety performance data from the inspection can affect the BASIC or CSA score.

How do I get my CSA scores down?

Says Eric Arnold of Arnold Safety Consulting:

“I am asked over and over again, ‘how do I get my CSA scores down?’ Generally speaking, you have to control your drivers. You can’t just turn them loose and let them do whatever they want to do. Every time they get written up by the police at a scalehouse, or on the side of the road, your score goes up. You need to be in your drivers’ ears all the time. It’s not too much more complicated than that.”

In addition, I recommend that you—

1. Become aware of your CSA scores. The CSA scores can be checked at:

2. Have a process in place for immediate repair of any vehicle safety defects or faults. A successful maintenance program should be 80% proactive or preventative, and 20% reactive. Catch problems when they are small and manageable.

3. Make sure your driver(s) understand Hours of Service rules and regulations (Part 395).

4. Make sure drivers are well-rested and alert when they drive.

5. Hire well. Do good background investigations and drug and alcohol testing, if required. Road test drivers before hire and do driver check rides at least annually.

6. Have a set of written standards for your fleet. Document driver and vehicle expectations. Provide drivers with safety training, manuals, guides and training. Monitor driving performance and give feedback when necessary.

7. Learn and know the DOT regulations. Know what the regulations expect of you and your team. Then communicate your expectations, on a daily basis.

Organizations with low CSA scores do all of the above and more.

J Taratuta

John Taratuta is an independent Risk Engineer. (989) 474-9599